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The godless and lawless march on!

December 9, 2012

They have found  a leader.

Add This Group To Obama’s Winning Coalition: ‘Religiously Unaffiliated ‘ : It’s All Politics : NPR / by Liz Halloran / December 09, 2012 3:49 AM / http://n.pr/TP60c5

The big demographic story out of the 2012 presidential election may have been President Obama’s domination of the Hispanic vote, and rightfully so. [/] But as we close the book on the election, it bears noting that another less obvious bloc of key swing state voters helped the president win a second term. [/] They’re the “nones” — that’s the Pew Research Center’s shorthand for the growing number of American voters who don’t have a specific religious affiliation. Some are agnostic, some atheist, but more than half define themselves as either “religious” or “spiritual but not religious,” Pew found in a recent survey .

They are typically younger, more socially liberal than their forebears, vote Democratic, and now make up nearly 20 percent of the country’s population. Exit polls suggest that 12 percent of voters on Election Day were counted as “religiously unaffiliated.” […] the religiously unaffiliated voters are almost as strongly Democratic as white evangelicals are Republican, polls show. [/] Their overwhelming support of Obama proved crucial in a number of swing states where the president lost both the Catholic and Protestant vote by single and low-double digits, but won the “nones” by capturing 70-plus percent of their votes.

[…] — In Ohio, Obama lost the Protestant vote by 3 points and the Catholic vote by 11, but he won the “nones” — 12 percent of the state’s electorate — by 47 points. [/] — In Virginia, Obama lost Protestants by 9 points and Catholics by 10 points, but won 76 percent of the “nones,” who were 10 percent of the electorate. [/] — In Florida, Obama lost Protestants by 16 points and Catholics by 5 points, but captured 72 percent of the “nones.” They were 15 percent of the electorate. [/] Similar results were seen in states including Michigan, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania.

[,,,] Nationally, Obama lost the Protestant vote by 15 points, won the Catholic vote by 2 points, and captured 70 percent of the “nones.” [/] “My question is what is it about having no religion that makes you align so dramatically with the Democratic Party,” Selzer says. “Sociologically, how fascinating is this?”

[…] The growth in their numbers as part of the electorate is driven in large part by generational change, and generational replacement, Smith says. [/] “Young people just now entering adulthood are not only significantly more religiously unaffiliated compared with their elders today,” he says, but they are also more religiously unaffiliated than previous generations of young people. […] Pew has tracked their growth, and found that in 2010 about a quarter of those in the “millennial generation” defined themselves as religiously unaffiliated. That’s up from the 20 percent of Gen X-ers who said they had no religious affiliation, and 13 percent of baby boomers who said the same. […]

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